5th Dec, 2016

Stratford businessman says Brexit would not have negative affect on businesses

Stratford Editorial 11th Jun, 2016 Updated: 28th Oct, 2016

BRITAIN voting to leave the European Union will not have a negative impact on business and trade.

So says prominent town businessman Denys Shortt who believes the move could in fact strengthen the ties between the UK and the rest of Europe.

It follows a visit from prominent leave campaigner Boris Johnson to Mr Shortt’s company DCS Group this week.

The Tory MP and former London Mayor was joined by Justice Secretary Michael Gove, MP Gisela Stuart and Chairman of the Vote Leave Business Council John Longworth as they rallied support for the leave campaign.

Having undergone a private tour of the factory, the quartet addressed staff at the company’s Timothy’s Bridge Road HQ on their views over the impending EU referendum.

Mr Johnson spoke about the risks of not being able to control migration if Britain stayed in the EU. He also claimed the leave campaign was “winning all the democratic points” with the arguments to remain “morally and practically wrong.”

Speaking afterwards, Mr Shortt, who is also in favour of a Brexit when the country goes to the polls on June 23, said he was convinced leaving was the best option for Britain.

On the subject of how businesses would be affected should Britain vote to leave the EU, he told The Observer: “I truly believe the EU has undermined our sovereignty, our laws and indeed, our border control.

“I think our company and others will actually do better outside the EU. Britain is a very resourceful country and we are considered a great place to do business and a safe place to invest money – I do not see that as changing.”

Mr Shortt also said he believes the country should follow the lead of countries like Australia where businesses sponsor employees on a visa to come and work for them.

He added: “I think Brexit will enhance our business but a better system of border control with visas like in Australia would be beneficial.

“We can then invite people from India, Australia and China to work at DCS whereas at the moment the EU population has preferential treatment.”

But Mr Shortt was keen to stress the move would not affect his existing employees – many of whom come from Europe.

He said: “We are very proud of our people from Poland and Europe – they are good workers and do a great job at DCS.

“This would not change – these people would be sponsored by us post-Brexit and we would hope they will stay with us for many years to come.

“We want people from abroad who will contribute to society by working hard, who will pay their taxes and help grow our economy not people who will leach off our benefits system.”