September 28th, 2016

Stratford Armouries sell off history

Updated: 4:13 pm, May 07, 2015

BIDDERS from as far afield as Australia snapped up a piece of history as a Stratford museum made more than £360,000 auctioning off hundreds of its artefacts.

The vast majority of the 620 lots being sold by Stratford Armouries were bought during the auction at the Pathlow-based museum on Saturday (March 28).

A global community of bidders used telephone, commission and internet bids, joining a strong turnout of collectors in the sale room to fight it out for a host of lots dating back as far as the 16th century.

A dagger with a crystal handle believed to have been owned by Lawrence of Arabia sold for £3,100, while a 16th century carved wooden soldier was the most expensive lot, selling for £9,000.

Other lots included suits of armour, weaponry, art, furniture, items of heavy artillery and taxidermy.

Museum boss James Wigington decided to put the items up for sale as he wants to move it in a different direction and focus on the English Civil War and the First and Second World Wars.

Ben Gamble, of auctioneers Cuttlestones, described the auction as a ‘once in a lifetime sale’.

He said: “As ever with auctions, there can be some surprises on the day and this sale proved no exception – with some lots flying way above their estimated values and others not selling on the day itself.

“This included, to our surprise, the particularly impressive horse and knight armour that was once housed in the New York Met museum.

“However, we do have significant interest in this and some of the other large items of armour that didn’t sell under the hammer and we’re confident of negotiating sales for these.

“We’re now flat out organising delivery of lots that sold to bidders as far afield as China, the USA and Australia.”

The full sale results including remaining items can be viewed at www.cuttlestones.co.uk.

What a boar! This late 19th century wild boar’s head inset within a hunting horn sold for £480. (s)

This dagger believed to have been the property of Lawrence of Arabia sold for £3,100. (s)

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