10th Dec, 2016

'Stronger case than ever' for rail line between Stratford and Long Marston

Stratford Editorial 20th Nov, 2015 Updated: 28th Oct, 2016

RAIL campaigners claim there is a stronger case than ever for a new line between Stratford and Long Marston.

It follows a report by the Avon Rail Link group outlining the social and economic benefits developing the line would have.

The report highlighted the benefit of reinstating the six mile line, and running two trains an hour each way, which would

end Stratford’s ‘dead end’ line and create alternative routes to London.

The minimum cost of reinstating the line is estimated at £53million – of which 30 per cent would be paid for by developers.

A business plan would be needed to attract further backers.

The works would include alterations to lines at Stratford and Long Marston to accommodate the new track.

The report says tourists from Thames Valley, Oxford and Cotswold line stations would also have easier access to the town by rail which would help ease congestion on Stratford’s traffic-choked roads.

Group spokesman Tony Dennis said: “Our report shows the line to Long Marston is financially viable and now we need to take plans further but we need people to get behind it.

“The line would go some way to easing traffic problems Stratford faces on the roads at the moment. It’s very well spending money on helping the congestion in and around the town but a rail link would eliminate a number of cars from the roads because it would support everyone from students traveling to college as well as tourists.”

Residents near the proposed Honeybourne line have already voiced their concerns about noise from rail services, but the Avon Rail Link group argues the line would operate almost unnoticed.

Mr Dennis added: “We have considered environmental matters which is why the current plans don’t accommodate use for freight trains and there would be very little opportunity for them in the timetable that has been drawn up.

“The line would descend from Stratford through a cutting and into a short tunnel under Evesham Place. It only reemerges above the cutting to cross over the river so noise would be kept to a minimum.”

Visit www.shakesepareline.com for further details.