September 7th, 2016

Midwife struck off after Warwick Hospital baby death

Midwife struck off after Warwick Hospital baby death Midwife struck off after Warwick Hospital baby death
Updated: 4:11 pm, May 07, 2015

A MIDWIFE has been struck off after the death of a baby at Warwick Hospital.

A hearing of the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) in London was told Kay Francis had put patients at ‘unwarranted risk’ between June 2011 and October 2012 and showed ‘little regret or remorse’ for those she had failed.

Ms Francis – a midwife for South Warwickshire Foundation Trust (SWFT) for five years from 2008 – was found to have inadequately risk-assessed Sarah Kunigiski in 2012 and later failed to notice her son’s unborn heart rate had slowed down.

Mrs Kunigiski’s baby, Daniel, was born with a brain injury and died a few days after being transferred to Coventry’s University Hospital.

Just a week later Ms Francis failed to properly examine another baby after concerns were raised by its mother about its breathing. It was later admitted to intensive care with a bacterial blood infection.

The hearing was the second time she had been subject to an investigation.

She was previously accused of incorrectly administering a labour-inducing drug – which led to her being put on a supervised practice programme, during which time many of the charges took place.

A spokesman for the panel said: “Ms Francis’ behaviour was unacceptable and the actions took place over a significant period, both during and immediately after a long period of supervision.

“The panel considered her failings had the potential to put patients at unwarranted risk of harm and to bring the midwife profession into disrepute.

“There was a lack of any real regret and remorse for both the women and babies involved and a significant risk she would repeat her errors.”

The NMC panel have now struck off Ms Francis and she cannot apply for her name to be restored onto the nursing and midwife register for at least five years.

A spokeswoman from South Warwickshire Foundation Trust (SWFT) said: “Patient safety is our number one priority. Following any incident we ensure that it is fully investigated and make any improvements that are needed.”

The trust recently issued the Kunigiski family with an apology and five-figure payout following Daniel’s death.

The family then launched an appeal calling for hospitals to take greater accountability when mistakes were made.

Family solicitor Jeanette Whyman, of Wright Hassall, said: “This has been a long drawn out and, understandably, emotional process for Sarah and her family but at least now they can take some comfort in knowing that Ms Francis has been reprimanded by her professional disciplinary body.

“Throughout this case there was a failure by the hospital and trust to take accountability for the serious breaches which occurred which is something that, in our experience, we regularly see in medical negligence cases.

“The decision by the NMC shows that appropriate sanctions will be applied when allegations of breaches of duty are proven which is important for the Kunigiskis family and other families who sadly find themselves facing similar tragic situations in the future.”

Comments